Monday, 2 May 2022

Drinking under the radar

In the early 1970s, whether or not a pub sold real ale was largely due to the policies of the owning brewery, and many busy, high-profile pubs didn’t. However, over the following two decades, the growing influence of CAMRA meant that real ale became seen as something desirable to have on the bar, and its absence was likely to deter potential customers. So numerous brewers started to make it much more widely available in their estates, and some started brewing it again after a lengthy gap. So-called beer deserts where it was previously very thin on the ground, such as London, Norfolk and Cornwall, were watered. In many areas, over 80% of pubs stocked it, and the remaining keg-only pubs were often a long tail of run-down, unprepossessing establishments catering only for diehard locals.

However, a key change took place in the 1990s. The transfer of pubs from breweries to pub companies took away a lot of the kudos of being able to say “85% of our pubs serve real ale”, and the pubcos found that stripping it out made life easier for licensees without any loss of trade. So a lot of the smaller, less prominent locals lost their real ale and remain without it to this day, if indeed they are still open. I wrote about these trends here. It’s easy to go round the country following the recommendations of pub and beer guides and find virtually no pubs apart from a few craft bars, without real ale, and conclude that the battle for cask has been won. But, outside the town and village centres, and off the main roads, there are stil plenty of unabashed keg-only boozers to be found.

A week ago last Sunday, our friend Cooking Lager boldly set out to try a few of them on Castle Street, the main shopping street of the Stockport district of Edgeley. Edgeley is an area to the west of the town centre that has retained most of its traditional terraced housing and is now showing the odd green shoot of gentrification. The half-mile strip of Castle Street, along what was the main road to Cheadle and Altrincham before it was bypassed by Mercian Way, developed a surprisingly extensive local shopping centre, perhaps helped by being on the other side of the main railway line and up a steep hill from the main town centre.

It used to have a Woolworth’s and branches of most of the main clearing banks. These are gone now, but it still has a supermarket, a post office, a Boots, a furniture store and a branch of Home Bargains where I am a regular visitor. Most of the shop units are still occupied, although nowadays they are more likely to be convenience stores, takeaways, cafés, nail parlours, phone repairers and bookies.

Perhaps surprisingly, it has retained most of its pubs, with five of the seven that were trading in the mid-80s still being open, although rather more pubs in the surrounding back streets have closed. The two casualties were the Grapes, a plain, traditional local that didn’t fit Robinson’s increasingly upmarket aspirations, and the Windsor Castle, a large 1930s pub that in the 1980s was converted to “Windsor Sports”, but was then allowed to go steadily downhill, and ended up being utterly squalid. On one occasion, a regular died in his seat, but nobody noticed until chucking-out time. It has now been demolished and replaced by a row of shops with flats above. Probably a factor in the pubs’ survival is that, on landlocked sites on a low-rent shopping street, the potential for redevelopment is limited.

I have certainly visited all of these pubs on various CAMRA pub crawls over the years, although only two of the five now stock cask beer of any kind. I suspect I may not have been in the Jolly Crofter and the Pineapple this century. My most recent visits were to the Prince Albert, the only pub to have cask on a CAMRA crawl, and to the “Bobby Peel” (properly the Sir Robert Peel) to redeem a voucher for a free pint of Stella issued by Punch Taverns.

Cookie’s verdict was in general fairly positive, although it was on a Sunday lunchtime, and the pubs are likely to get considerably livelier on a Friday night. The Jolly Crofter and the Bobby Peel have both fairly recently been refurbished, although in the case of the latter it seems to have been an exercise in providing an interior of posing tables for a clientele of old blokes. He was also pretty happy with all the lager he drank, although as long as you keep it cool and turn it over quickly enough it’s hard to go wrong. He doesn’t really comment on the wider beer ranges, but it would have been interesting to hear which smooth bitters these pubs sold, and whether any offered any throwback keg milds.

The one exception was the Pineapple, of which he says “A shithole is the only description required of the pub.” This is the pub that has a handwritten sign on the door saying “Strictly no shoplifters”. On my forays to Home Bargains I notice that it seems to be open from 10 am, and there’s often a mobility scooter parked outside. Many years ago, I remember writing up a CAMRA pub crawl and describing, on a very hot Friday night, how the grossly fat barman was serving with his shirt unbuttoned, “exposing a vast expanse of wobbling flesh.” But enough people seem to be happy to give it their custom and keep it going.

Cask now only accounts for about a seventh of all beer sold in pubs, so in many cases you won’t do your business much harm by not stocking it. In general it isn’t done as a deliberate statement, but it’s a declaration of intent that you’re happy just to serve your own customer base and aren’t really bothered what the wider world thinks of you. Yet, to my mind, much of the interest of pubgoing stems not just from the beer itself, but from the atmosphere and the characters you encounter. And you will certainly find much more of both in a keg boozer than the monoculture of the typical micropub or taproom.

You will find very little about these places in most writing about beer and pubs, and nor are they likely to appear in any pub guides. Now that Alan Winfield is no longer with us, the only person who still seems to write about them is Life After Football. Yet they remain a significant part of the British pub scene that in a sense flies under the radar of fashionable commentary.

20 comments:

  1. The Pineapple is one of the last of its kind, a truly run-down shithole with no redeeming features. Wonder how long it will keep going in its current form.

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  2. Don't forget Phil at http://merseypub.blogspot.com/ who gets through more than his share of keg.

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    1. I've added that one to my blogroll as for some reason it wasn't already on there.

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  3. You two really make me want to see the Pineapple…

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  4. Castle Street is a dump. The Pineapple is known as P3 after the psychiatric ward of Stepping Hill hospital. The building that has replaced the Windsor Castle is one of the ugliest, cheapest-looking new buildings I know of.

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  5. Credit to Mr Lager for having the temerity to visit such establishments. Shame on those lacking the cahoonas that can only watch from the sidelines from the safety of a new entry to the guide CAMRA micropub. Now you know what real pubmanship is.

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  6. The Stafford Mudgie3 May 2022 at 10:19

    I was well pleased with both the welcome and the Timothy Taylors Landlord when I used the Prince Albert in March 2019.
    I must admit that I was there because it opened a good while before the marvelous Alexandra but see that it's now a Craft Union pub so should be well worth revisiting - and it'll be handy for your next foray to that Home Bargains shop.

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  7. I think we all have to collectively agree that Cooking Lager is the greatest pub man of all. No doubts about it. No one comes close. He's the pub man off all pub men. The prime pub man. The numero uno. The best of the best. The top. The very very best there is.

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    1. You are Cooking Lager, and I claim my £5!

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  8. There has always been a clash of cultures between working class boozers and more gentrified establishments. Each have the merits, and the patrons of both feel a little uncomfortable in each others territory.

    The fear of the gentrified is that the pub is a shithole, Those in the shithole probably don't see it that way, and may not have the means or inclination to drink and socialise anywhere else.

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  9. Great read.

    Expect those keg Edgeley boozers to be overrun with Sutton fans when Stockport return to the League.
    Beside Cookie and Life After Football, I recommend Mark Shirley's recent series of post on Corby's pubs, many of which make Edgely seem posh.

    https://corbypubsafari.blogspot.com/

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  10. I've got a few similar pubs near me. Most aren't actual shitholes* and are just relics of a different era. Some are surviving estate pubs, some town centre pubs and some city centre pubs clinging on before the inevitable gentrification. (* Other than the Albion, North Shields, which was raided a couple of weeks ago as the upstairs flat had been converted to agricultural use, and all of those on Wearside)

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  11. The Dangerman5 May 2022 at 07:43

    Whilst touring Scotland on the NC500 we popped in to the nearest pub to our B&B in Wick, and found a fairly run-down, keg only boozer in the middle of a residential area. Wick itself is not a glamorous destination, seemingly overlooked as a halt on the NC500 by its near neighbour Thurso. The regulars welcomed us with open arms and we had a good old natter, only leaving to find food for the evening.

    Sometimes going in with an open mind can lead to some pleasant memories, and turning around as a result of seeing no cask would have been a mistake. Cask in the furthest reaches of Scotland isn't always easy to come by, although I did manage a pint of it in The Applecross Inn, a pub nowhere near anywhere, but that just happens to be in both a beautiful location and perfectly placed after a morning's drive from Ullapool.

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    1. I love real ale but some of my most enjoyable pub experiences ever have been in keg-only ‘basic boozers’. I never understood the mentality of those who walk straight out of a pub upon seeing no cask.

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  12. "Now that Alan Winfield is no longer with us, the only person who still seems to write about them is Life After Football."

    Plus you of course. 😎

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    1. I don't actually visit keg pubs, though. Hard to recall when I last did - probably Sam Smith's Sinclair's in Manchester pre-Covid. I've been in a couple of Sam's pubs more recently where they had run out of cask OBB.

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  13. Is old Humphrey getting soft? He's now allowing (fake) plants and curtains. What next, card payments and jukeboxes?

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    1. Oh, some of Humph's pubs are pretty smart - curtains, flowers, scatter cushions, pictures on the walls etc.

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  14. Thanks for the plug Mudgie and I reckon The Pineapple sounds well worth a visit!!! I often find that however unappealing a pub looks it is nearly always better than you'd imagine and often some top notch characters in there.
    I went into the Ferrers Arms today - a pub on the edge of Asda car park in Sinfin. There was still one cask option on, Everards Tiger, and the punters were friendly and just enjoying #publife.....

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    1. I think you'd find much to enjoy in the other four pubs, but the Pineapple is, as Cookie says, a complete shithole with no redeeming features. The only interest of a visit there would be sociological.

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